Whatcom Falls Fall Foliage Colors

Whatcom Falls in Whatcom Falls Park in Bellingham, Washington State, USA

whatcom falls at whatcom falls park in bellingham washington usa

Fall Foliage at Whatcom Falls (Purchase)

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 Whatcom Falls park in Bellingham is one of the few US based places I remember going to as a kid from British Columbia. I remember going down and spending the afternoon fishing and having lunch or dinner on one of the park benches. When I visited it again probably 20 years later I remembered the name, but not the waterfalls or what I was about to find to photograph. I made this image way back in 2009, but it remains one of my favourites of the main falls in Whatcom Falls Park. I occasionally “complain” about the fall foliage colours in this part of the world, but it looks like 2009 was a great year! Most of the fall foliage we get around here are from the Bigleaf Maple trees (Acer macrophyllum), or sometimes from the smaller Vine Maples (Acer circinatum). When they get the right conditions they can really give some great colors. The above photograph is the view at Whatcom Falls park of the main waterfall from the Limestone Bridge that crosses Whatcom Creek. Most of the fall foliage colours in this first photograph are from Bigleaf Maple trees.

whatcom falls at whatcom falls park in bellingham washington usa

Fall Foliage along Whatcom Creek (Purchase)

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 This second photograph is the view looking downstream on the other side of that same Limestone Bridge. There are a few larger Bigleaf Maple leaves in this photo but most of the colour here comes from the smaller leaved Vine Maples.

For my other photographs of Whatcom Falls Park please visit my Washington State Misc. Photos Gallery in my Image Library.

Trying something new – Blueberries, a Lightbox and Lights

Freshly picked Fraser Valley Highbush Blueberries in a bowl.

fresh organic highbush blueberries from the fraser valley in a bowl

Experimenting with my lightbox – a bowl of blueberries (Purchase)

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   In early 2015 I decided to try something new photographically, which is probably a good idea to do from time to time. Occasionally I want to photograph something that isn’t a landscape, nature or macro subject. I’d seen many tutorials on how to construct your own lightbox on the internet, so last spring I built one. Then I didn’t use it for a few months as I made excuses about not having the right equipment (I didn’t) or subjects (I did). When I was picking blueberries at the end of last summer I decided I would try to get a “product” shot of these fresh blueberries in a bowl. Typically my blueberry related photography has been more along the lines of blueberries still on the bush. Next it was a matter of finding a relatively photogenic bowl which was harder than I’d first anticipated.

   After a number of exposures only using my Canon 7D’s built in flash and two desk lamps shining in the sides of the lightbox, I fully realized that this was a whole new kind of photography thing altogether. I’ve never tried to artificially light subjects, and not owning a dedicated flash seems to be a bit of a drawback in that regard. However, trying something new shouldn’t always be easy, and so there were many ugly exposures before this one came to life. So, thinking this was my best effort so far, I put it up on the blog here which drew my attention to how “white” the background of the image is (or isn’t, in this case). That is my point here though – I’m trying something new and that is not something that usually starts with success right away. I am hoping I will soon regard this image as a failure, even though right now it is the best of its type that I have – because that would mean progress has been made.

   I believe I will soon be buying a flash for this kind of photography and a few other uses I have in mind. Once I spend some actual cash and not just time putting together a cardboard and poster paper lightbox the real “pressure” will be on!

Fall at Deer Lake in Sasquatch Provincial Park

Fall Maple leaves (Acer Macrophyllum) on the slopes of Sasquatch Peak in Sasquatch Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada.

fall foliage at deer lake in sasquatch provincial park

Fall foliage on Sasquatch Peak at Deer Lake (Purchase)

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   This year was not a great one for fall leaf colors in the Fraser Valley, probably in part due to the 4 month drought we had this summer. I am used to not having area-wide color and having to hunt a little for it though. Much like wildflowers, sometimes you only need one good spot to make a good photograph. One of the areas I checked for fall foliage this year was Deer Lake in Sasquatch Provincial Park. Just a short drive up the side of Harrison Lake near Harrison Hot Springs, Sasquatch Provincial Park is a nice recreation spot with 3 lakes, campgrounds, and hiking trails.

   In the spring of 2013 I photographed a nice reflection at Deer Lake and noted it might be a good place to come back for fall foliage. The first photograph here is the result – though it did come with some problems. I had set up to somewhat recreate the photo linked above but a man showed up and was about to wade out into my reflection area to fish. I pointed out I would like to make two quick photos and I’d be finished. He doesn’t say anything but proceeds to wade into the water right in front of me and began fly fishing. After briefly wondering how my tripod would work as a cudgel I decided to simply photograph over his head and forgo the reflection shot for this year. I like the results – the top photograph here and its alternates in my library have a nice mix of green conifers, fall maple leaf colors, and various snags and other light colored tree trunks. About 10 minutes after making these photos I heard him yelling and swearing. I looked around the corner and I guess his casting had gone awry and he had hooked himself in the back. I still do not feel bad about this.

fishing for trout at deer lake in sasquatch provincial park

Fishing for Rainbow Trout at Deer Lake (Purchase)

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   I briefly chatted with the older man and woman in the above photo as they were fishing for Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) off the end of the dock at Deer Lake. As with many other lakes in BC, Deer Lake is stocked with fish by the Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC. For some of the reflection photographs I made at Deer Lake I had to wait until the ripples from rising fish dissipated – so it would appear this lake has a decent fish population. The fall foliage in the background of this photo is growing on the slopes of Sasquatch Peak, which is taller than the nearby Mount Hicks.

kayaking at deer lake in sasquatch provincial park

Kayaking on Deer Lake (Purchase)

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   The trails at Deer Lake don’t allow one to walk around the entire lake. These kayaks look like a great way to explore the shoreline.

fall foliage at deer lake in sasquatch provincial park

Fall foliage at Deer Lake (Purchase)

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   I included the above photograph in my 2016 Nature Calendar and the Top 10 Photographs of 2015 blog post. I think this might have been the best fall foliage scene I found this year, and the lack of wind (or fish ripples) at the time made for a very nice reflection. I may try to visit Sasquatch Provincial Park in the winter and see what scenes I can find when the trees have no leaves at all.

boardwalk at deer lake in sasquatch provincial park

Boardwalk over a marsh on the Deer Lake Trail (Purchase)

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   This is the Deer Lake Trail between the parking lot and “The Point” – just below the Bench Campground. I liked the colours around the boardwalk here, and the light colored trunks of the Red Alder (Alnus rubra).

For more photographs from Deer Lake visit my Sasquatch Provincial Park Gallery.

My Top 10 Photos of 2015

   I consider these lists more of a top 10 favourite photographs of that year than the “best”. Which of my photographs are “the best” is probably better left for others to decide. Once again, I am making this post so I can be a part of Jim Goldstein’s annual Your Best Photos project. Look for his post early in the new year with all the entries from a wide variety of photographers. His project is always a great place to find new photographers and their work.

   I hope you enjoy the following photographs and I am curious if you have a favourite. Clicking on each photograph takes you to my Image Archive but below you’ll also find links to corresponding blog posts if they exist. While these are in no specific order that first panorama of Bagley Lakes might be my favourite overall. Here are my top 10 photos of 2015:

top 10 photos - bagley lakes panorama fall
Panorama of the Bagley Lakes at the bottom of Table Mountain and Mount Herman

(Mount-Baker Snoqualmie National Forest, Washington State)
Blog post: Bagley Lakes Panorama

fall foliage colours reflecting on deer lake
Fall foliage colours reflect on the surface of Deer Lake

(Sasquatch Provincial Park, British Columbia)

Read the rest of this entry »

Spawning Salmon at Weaver Creek

Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) at the Weaver Creek Spawning Channel in British Columbia, Canada

male sockeye salmon jumping in weaver creek spawning channel

Male Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) jumping in the Weaver Creek (Purchase)

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   One of the best places to see spawning salmon near the Metro Vancouver area is the Weaver Creek Spawning Channel in the Fraser Valley. Weaver Creek runs through the District of Kent from Weaver Lake through to the Harrison River. In the fall Fisheries and Oceans Canada opens the channel area to the public to view the spawning salmon. I first came here as a kid, but have returned a number of times in the past few years to photograph the salmon.

sockeye salmon swimming in weaver creek spawning channel

Male Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) swimming upstream (Purchase)

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   Without an underwater housing and other special equipment most of the photographs one will be able to create will be looking at the salmon in the water, or jumping out of it. Photographing fish under water, from above, just leads to distorted salmon photos that don’t really work most of the time. After a few years of failed attempts at salmon photography I worked within these limitations and imagined a photograph with the salmon backs out of the water, with a glow from sunset or some other sort of reflection on the water. I did manage to create that salmon photograph eventually but it remains a bit more abstract than the images on this page.

sockeye salmon swimming in weaver creek spawning channel

Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) on an aeration plate (Purchase)

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   Throughout the channel there are “aeration plates” that add oxygen to the water but also likely prevent erosion of the small rises in elevation between the sections of the channel. The first image in this post shows a male Sockeye leaping into the air to get over one of the higher jumps to get into the channel. The aeration plates in the upper part of the channel are considerably lower. One of those is shown in the image above. Sometimes the salmon don’t quite have enough momentum or strength in order to get over the plates. This one came close, was swept back into the lower level but made it on the second attempt.

sockeye salmon swimming in weaver creek spawning channel

Salmon spawning in the Weaver Creek Spawning Channel (Purchase)

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For more photographs of salmon and other wildlife please visit my Animals & Wildlife Gallery.

Holiday Print Sale – Save 20%

It is time for my holiday print sale! From now through January 8th, 2016 all of my Fine Art Prints and Canvas Wraps are 20% off! Just use the code HOLIDAY20 (case sensitive) at checkout.

holiday print sale fine art prints and canvas wraps

Lower Falls on Gold Creek (Purchase)

   Select the photograph(s) you are interested in from my Image Library, add your desired product and size to your cart, and use the coupon code HOLIDAY20 at checkout. More about my prints and ordering information can be found on my Purchase page in the menu above. If you are interested in a photo that is not yet in my Image Library but instead found here on my Photoblog (or on a social media site), please send me an email indicating which photograph you are interested in and what size/product you wish to order – the discount will still apply!

Bagley Lakes Panorama

Panorama of the Bagley lakes in the Mount-Baker Snoqualmie National Forest, Washington State, USA.

bagley lakes fall panorama

Panorama of Bagley Lake (Purchase)

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   You can see this view of Bagley Lakes from the Fire and Ice Trail in the Heather Meadows area of the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. This lake lies between Table Mountain (left) and Mount Herman – the Chain Lakes Trail runs right past it on the way up to Herman Saddle. I still have a lot more in this area to explore with my camera, but I was quite happy to find the lake with these sorts of colours and water levels. On the right you can see where the Chain Lakes Trail goes over a rocky slope that extends right down to the water. Now that my new computer doesn’t choke on larger resolution files, I was able to make this image with two rows of vertical images (35 of them) for the extra resolution which is how I try to shoot all my panoramas now. This worked very well, and I hope to see this one printed in the future.

   The talus slope in the middle of the frame is where I photographed an American Pika a few years back. I could hear a few cheeping their warning calls while I was shooting this panorama but I wasn’t able to spot any of them.

You can view more of my photography from Heather Meadows in my Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest Gallery.

Whytecliff Park in the Fog

Fog nearly hides the island at Whytecliff Park in West Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

fog at whytecliff park in west vancouver british columbia canada

Fog at Whytecliff Park in West Vancouver

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   I mentioned in an earlier post that some of my early October photography plans were somewhat thwarted by the fog rolling by the shore in West Vancouver. I was happy to find almost no fog in Horseshoe Bay but I visited Whytecliff Park in West Vancouver shortly after and as you can see, there a lot of fog just offshore. Part of my plan was to photograph one of the BC Ferries as it passed, but obviously this was not possible. There are almost no photography days where everything goes according to plan, so I embraced the fog and stopped at Whytecliff just to photograph it. Quite often a change in plans just means I manage to photograph scenes I could not anticipate ahead of time. I did enjoy photographing this scene with the fog as it is not something I get to work with very often, so this was a nice change. It was a bit cold though, which made for a more peaceful visit than usual. Going to Whytecliff in the summer means the beach will be elbow to elbow with beachgoers.

For more of my photography from this area of British Columbia visit my Vancouver Coast & Mountains Gallery in my Image Library.